Gotham "What the Little Bird Told Him" (REVIEW)

written by Omar Castillon (@omar_castillon)

Remember the Arkham inmate that was terrorizing Gordon in the previous episode? Well he’s on the loose in this episode and he is out on a revenge streak against his crime buddies (enemies?) It turns out that Jack Gruber (or Buchinsky) used to have a connection with Maroni. But aside from this plot point, this episode also had the opportunity to move forward with Fish Mooney’s plot to dethrone Falcone once and for all. Gordon has 24 hours to hunt down Gruber and gain his detective position in GCPD. The question is, does this all happen smoothly?

Jack Gruber... Gotham's Electrocutioner

Jack Gruber... Gotham's Electrocutioner

Let’s start with the Gruber plot point. He has some great scenes with his zombified partner in crime using electricity to take down their victims. Gruber even uses some elaborate devices that come from a mad scientist or rather someone like him. Funny enough he gets the title of “The Electrocutioner” by the press and according to the Batman lore, this character is considered one of the minor villains. Ultimately Gruber is out to find Maroni which at first is somewhat of a mystery in the episode but we find out midway through the episode what Gruber’s intentions are about. Gordon comes into the equation when GCPD starts investigating the break-in that occurred at the beginning of the episode. The commissioner makes an appearance and to our dismay, Gordon confronts the commissioner with some cojones and says that he would find Gruber in 24 hours. A set time limit and something to lose, Gordon has finally shed a little bit of his “play it safe” attitude. This is definitely a sign of progress for Gordon that was much needed in the series. The end result of this plot point is actually pretty interesting, but I won’t spoil all of the fun.

tasked with catching Gruber in 24 hours, Gordon AND Bullock's career's depend on it

tasked with catching Gruber in 24 hours, Gordon AND Bullock's career's depend on it

In the second plot point, Fish finally has Liza become a pawn in her scheme to take down Falcone. The biggest gripe aside from the almost amateur way Fish pretends to have Liza hostage is the offer she gives Falcone. Instead of a typical death threat, Fish offers Falcone to leave the city safely or Liza gets it. This discredited Fish Mooney’s plans pretty drastically since it sounds so stupid. It’s no wonder later on in the episode she gets her comeuppance. Again not really going to say what all happens to her, but it all connects with Cobblepot’s slip of the tongue midway through the whole Gruber/Maroni extravaganza.

Liza has Falcone wraped around her tiny little finger

Liza has Falcone wraped around her tiny little finger

Speaking of Cobblepot, he never ceases to amaze me in this series. He’s so conniving and slimy, but he fits this world perfectly. Even his scene in the middle where he spills the beans about his business to Maroni, he borders on the edge of insanity. It also goes to show how pivotal Cobblepot is to the lore of “Gotham” and how he will soon shape the world we are familiar with in the eyes of Batman/Bruce Wayne. One other thing to note is the lack of Bruce and Alfred in these past few episodes. This is a good decision writing wise since I was kind of getting sick of the shoehorned in scenes that don’t connect too much to the storyline on that particular episode. One character that did seem shoehorned in (or not) was Barbara. We see her creepy parents…so I guess that’s something…

Gruber face to face with Gordon

Gruber face to face with Gordon

It goes without saying that this show is a must watch, but now that it has been renewed for a second season, this is a good sign of things to come. Now we can speculate on what might happen in the second season now, but I would rather keep an open mind on what could happen. There is plenty of lore to explore (unintentional rhyme) that hasn’t been touched. I’ll stay tuned for next week’s episode, I suggest you check out this week’s episode as well next week’s, the week after and so on and so forth.